Staff cried and expressed dismay with the publishing giant’s decision to publish

Several Penguin Random House Canada employees confronted management about the company’s decision to publish a new book by controversial Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson at an emotional town hall Monday, and dozens more have filed anonymous complaints, according to four workers who spoke to VICE World News… More here.

One step away from book burning if you ask me. I struggle to understand how he could be classed as controversial.



Categories: Books

7 replies

  1. I can’t speak for this situation, but I am starting to get very concerned with where thought has gone generally. We used to allow dissenting views, and challenge them eg. with counter arguments & facts. These days?
    – Want to discuss something controversial? Historically booed and critiqued. Today – Deplatformed
    – Floating voter who didnt vote labour? Historically, recognised as a vote needed to win next time. Today – despised with hate messages.

    Split society (brexit vs eu, trump vs the world, etc) feels like just part&parcel of all this.

  2. I’m going to be controversial now (sorry) – I’ve seen specific concern with the RNA based vaccines for covid being developed. (new approach never tried before etc). My partner has enough area qualifications (to Phd) to say she’d like to ask their scientists some specific questions to be comfortable. She would prefer the Oxford vaccine (I’m going to trust her too).
    My travels around the world have resulted in more vaccines than hot dinners for me, so I’ve no concerns in general. BUT – read views on the above, and people scream anti-vaxxer. I think parliament is proposing making such discussions illegal? (https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/coronavirus-vaccine-covid-anti-vax-labour-censor-b1723009.html).

    Anyway my Q is not about the above points specifically, just to ask – where do we draw the line between blocking dangerous hate speech etc, and blocking debate?

  3. In Canada, he’s very controversial. But in my opinion, he says things in a way to be controversial. I have no problem with anyone asking a question, or even stating an opinion. And yes, we do have hate laws in Canada but they are very specific. I listened to an interview with him once and while I too might question the need to enshrine into law the need to use specific pronouns, he seemed to go out of his way to be controversial about it. Maybe that’s the way he gets his audience. I don’t pretend to be a Jordan Peterson expert.

    As for the company that’s publishing the book, they must have known how their decision would be taken. Just because an author wants a book published doesn’t mean a company has to publish. Many potential books have been rejected. These days, if one really wants to be published, one can use online options. Do I think that they published for the money? Of course, they’re not a charity. The fact that they needed the town hall meant that they knew it would cause issues with many people.

  4. Just his mannerism. More in your face. Maybe it’s my Canadian reaction.

    Part of the problem I have is that while I might agree with some of things he says, it’s then assumed that I agree with all of things he says, which I don’t. And I certainly don’t agree with how he presents them. Canadians, at least in my experience, are quite open to discussing something calmly and politely. But get in their faces and their backs go up and whatever argument you may have had is lost.

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