Pay to avoid adverts then pay more to avoid adverts. No thanks…

That means Disney+ will also see its existing ad-free tier increase in price, starting on December 8, to $10.99 per month or $109.99 per year, a 37.5 percent increase. Technically, long-term Disney+ subscribers will see a price hike at the lowest tier, as well, as the existing $79.99 per year option ($6.66/mo) will be discontinued. If you want to pre-pay to save, you’ll have to do so at the no-advertisements tier… More here.

The current pricing models don’t seem to be working, but it’s a hard sell to try to get more for the same service.

Don’t Reply to iPhone Thieves

“The messages prey on people’s emotions by giving them the impression they have access to personal things such as photos, even if they actually don’t,” Campbell said. “Many people don’t think clearly, just think about wanting their lost data or not wanting it to get in the wrong hands.” More here.

Suspect most reading this would not fall for it, but if sharing saves one person from these scumbags it’s worth posting.

Fitbit ending support for PC music file transfers

faceless woman using devices for health monitoring
Photo by Ketut Subiyanto on Pexels.com

If you’re the owner of a Fitbit Versa, Versa 2, or Ionic, you’ll soon no longer be able to transfer music from your computer to your Fitbit device. In a support page spotted by 9to5Google, Fitbit says it’s discontinuing its Fitbit Connect app on October 13th, leaving you with only two ways to download music to your device: a paid subscription to either Pandora or Deezer… More here.

Has Fitbit ever supported the transferring of music to any of their devices in a way that made even trying to do it worthwhile? This is an area in which Apple is killing Fitbit, Garmin and the rest. Absolutely killing them.

A left-out generation that will never recover from the scars

man in blue denim jeans sitting beside white short coat dog
Photo by MART PRODUCTION on Pexels.com

The reality is grim and undeniable: a financial timebomb will explode for families in October as a second round of fuel price rises in six months sends shockwaves through every household and pushes millions over the edge. A few months ago, Jonathan Bradshaw and Antonia Keung at York University estimated that April’s 54% increase in fuel prices would trap 27 million people in 10m households in fuel poverty. Now, 35 million people in 13m households – an unprecedented 49.6% of the population of the United Kingdom – are under threat of fuel poverty in October… More here.

It is truly shocking what is happening in the UK at the moment because literally nothing is happening to stop the disaster that is coming this Winter. The government is paralysed by infighting and a silly election for the next Prime Minster who will be voted for by 0.3% of the population. Johnson has been on holiday as has the Chancellor and they simply do not care.

Financiers and insurers are getting +10% pay rises while those who keep the country going are at approx 3% and big business is taking more rights away from workers every day without any consequence. I really don’t want to moan, but seriously. This has all gone on for way too long!

Why the Days Seem Shorter as We Get Older

man looking at his smartphone
Photo by Marcus Aurelius on Pexels.com

Why does it feel that the time passes faster as we get older? What is the physical basis for the impression that some days are slower than others? Why do we tend to focus on the unusual (the surprise), not on the ever present? This article unveils the physics basis for these common observations. The reason is that the measurable ‘clock time’ is not the same as the time perceived by the human mind. The ‘mind time’ is a sequence of images, i.e. reflections of nature that are fed by stimuli from sensory organs. The rate at which changes in mental images are perceived decreases with age, because of several physical features that change with age: saccades frequency, body size, pathways degradation, etc. The misalignment between mental-image time and clock time serves to unite the voluminous observations of this phenomenon in the literature with the constructal law of evolution of flow architecture, as physics… More here.

An excellent publication.

A ‘not quite working properly’ watch can beat them all

I picked up a Tissot Seastar Navigator from 1974 last week for a price that was hard to ignore. It was from a dealer I know well and is a genuine example of a watch that is growing in popularity, and it has aged exactly as you would expect; a few case marks, faded chronograph hand and a bezel that is just about readable 48 years later.

It needs a service because it is currently running about a minute fast per day, but for the first time I really do not care. I have historically been a little obsessed with my watches being as accurate as possible, but this watch has become jewellery for me. It just looks so good in the subtlest of ways and catches the eye from time to time thanks to the blue sub-dial, red second hand, faded orange chronograph hand and the faded black (now grey) bezel. It’s a curiosity of a watch that shows all of the design cues that so many brands are trying to replicate today, but there is no replication here. The Navigator is what it is and it shows its age in style.

Vintage watches can be expensive to buy and even more expensive to run. Buy yourself a 1970’s Rolex and you will be servicing it often if you wear it every day because, and this is from experience, they are not that reliable and were not particularly well built.

If you can leave behind the absolute need for a perfect timekeeper you can pick up a stylish timepiece that looks sublime in any situation and you may just find that the good design beats the bad timekeeping enough to keep it on your wrist. I am struggling to take this one off and so the end result will either be a service or only wearing it occasionally, but either way this particular model is, in my opinion, one of the very best vintage watches you can buy for a low price.

The HySpeed sneaker

When a fully-charged performance wear brand such as Athletic Propulsion Labs – or APL, as it’s more commonly known – and automobile heavyweights McLaren announce that they’re collaborating on luxury footwear, you know the results are going to be spectacular. It’s a high-speed collision of breakthrough technology and engineering with a slick, aerodynamic design… More here.

I like those… a lot.